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Posted 10/20/2017 9:14am by Jill Rendleman.

Chard is the multicolored addition this week along with tatsoi, another fall green.  Chard is best cooked until the stems are tender for best flavor, while tatsoi, just cook until the color is bright and beautiful.  You can put them both into a really healthy soup, I start with lentils (which take like 20 min to cook versus beans many hours) boiled until almost tender in a veggie or chicken broth.  When the lentils are about tender, I add chopped onion and older fresh tomatoes or a can of whole tomatoes.......when those flavors have come together, I add the chard and/or other greens right at the end and simmer lightly.  You never want to bring a soup to a hard boil, just a light simmer, as you are layering in the flavors.  Curry is a nice spice to add, but whatever you like.  Like many soups, this will be better on the second day and on the third!  

Chard on its own is great.......just take two minutes to cut up all.....I use a big knife and I don't do the thing of separating leaves from stems, just cut them all up at once, then toss them into hot olive oil, season with salt and pepper, I do add a touch of butter to chard at the end to soften the taste.  

Greens and sweet potatoes are one of my favorite fall dinners and a very healthy one at that.  

The big ugly white and red roots are fall French radishes out of control, they will have some heat.....we wash then slice ours into ice water, then add rice vinegar and salt and put them on salads.  Another thing is to put a lightly sweet dressing of olive oil, vinegar, and honey and soak in that 5 or so minutes before serving.   Look for more recipes at our farm website  www.allseasons-farm.com/recipe.   These are all great recipes from CSA farms and restaurants that use CSA veggies.  




 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 10/18/2017 9:00am by Jill Rendleman.

All went well last week.....thanks to members for returning boxes or bringing totes!  The weather has been fabulous for greens like fresh spinach so look for more of those.....I plan to put chard in the boxes (we have chard lovers)  so if you are a chard hater (I think I know who you are) I can substitute kale, but keep in mind, kale may be in the share next week.  Greens this time of year up your immune system and prepare it for winter, its a great time to put greens in olive oil with a little garlic and salt, toss them lightly till they are cooked through, and put on top of a baked or mashed potato.  The heavy rains took their toll on some of the more delicate plants and you may see a bit more dirt has splashed up onto bottom leaves.  Love this time of year, the bugs are starting to go away and the plants thrive in cool nights and warm days.  Got the new garlic planted yesterday......soil was nice and moist after the rains.....was plain old dust before.  More later......your farmer, Jill





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 10/14/2017 12:32pm by Jill Rendleman.

I really like this article as it summarizes the ways a Csa can make you a happier and healthier cooking cook!  enjoy, your farmer, Jill

by Katherine Deumling of Cook With What You Have

A CSA share offers a plethora of produce every week and with it varieties we may have never seen before, let alone cooked—a delight and a bit of a challenge, for sure.

Fresh, delicious vegetables chosen for me week after week is my idea of heaven. It hasn’t always been but I get more hooked every year. I’m hooked on the deliciousness, on not having to make any decisions about what vegetables to purchase, and on the creativity it inspires.

So, how does one get hooked?

Stock your Pantry, Two Ways:

Shop mostly to restock rather than for specific dishes. You’ll spend less time (and money) running to the store for last minute items and can instead spend your time cooking, eating, and creatively using what you already have.

This is a basic list but you certainly don’t need everything listed to cook many dishes. And, your pantry will reflect your particular taste. This is just a loose guide.

Purchased Goods for Pantry, Fridge and Freezer:

  • Lentils; French green, red, brown
  • Beans: black, pinto, white, chickpeas
  • Grains: brown and white rice, barley, farro, cornmeal/polenta, quinoa, pasta, couscous, bulgur
  • Seeds & nuts: sunflower, pumpkin, hazelnuts, walnuts, peanuts, almonds, etc.
  • Spices: cumin, coriander, mustard seeds, dried chilies, turmeric, caraway, paprika, cardamom
  • Herbs: thyme, oregano
  • Vinegars: cider, rice and red wine
  • Oils: olive, sunflower, coconut, sesame
  • Hot sauce, soy sauce, fish sauce
  • Dairy products
  • Eggs
  • Lemons and limes
  • Meat and fish in freezer: sausages, bacon, chicken, etc.

Semi-prepared Items:

When you have a little spare time you can add semi-prepared items to your fridge/ pantry that will make life much easier and tastier when you don’t have those extra few minutes to get a meal on the table.

  • Make a jar of vinaigrette and keep it in the fridge. Dress lettuces and greens as well as roasted vegetables or plain chickpeas/beans with the same vinaigrette, adding some chopped herbs and toasted seeds. Be creative!
  • Cook a good quantity of beans. Put beans out to soak before you go to work in the morning. Cook them that evening while you’re in the kitchen cooking something else for dinner anyway and have them ready for the next day or freeze half.
  • Cook twice as much rice, barley or farro as you need for any given meal and freeze half of it to make fried rice, rice and beans or a soup the following week on a particularly busy night when you need the head start.
  • Toast a cup of sunflower or pumpkin seeds and keep in a jar. Your salads will be better for them; your soups will have added crunch; your snacks will be cheaper and more nutritious!
  • Use a whole bunch of parsley or cilantro to make a quick, savory sauce with garlic, olive oil, lemon juice or vinegar. Stir in some thick yogurt for a creamy version. Having a flavorful component like this on hand means a plain bowl of rice or beans or a fried egg turns into a meal in no time.
  • Make chicken or any other meat, fish or vegetable stock and freeze.

Free Yourself from Strictly Following a Recipe
& Learn to Improvise and Substitute.

The more you cook—and you will be cooking (!)—the easier and more fun it is to substitute and adapt as you go. Families of vegetables such as brassicas and alliums have certain common characteristics that in many cases let you substitute one for another. However, there is no real shortcut to learning how to do this so experiment as much as you can—you’ll have plenty of opportunity. Here are a few general guidelines to get you started.

Root vegetables love to be roasted as do brassicas like kohlrabi, cauliflower, romanesco, Brussels sprouts and broccoli. Cut up, tossed with a little oil and salt and roasted in a single layer, they are delicious as is or can serve as the foundation for soups, mashes, salads, etc.

Onions, like their allium compatriots, shallots, scallions, leeks and garlic, are pungent raw and quite sweet cooked. If you don’t have an onion by all means use a leek, though leeks are sweeter and you might add a little acidity to balance it out and leeks are not so good raw. Scallions (green onions) and shallots can be substituted for onions and vice versa in many recipes, raw or cooked.

Sweet potatoes, potatoes, celery root, rutabagas and turnips and sometimes winter squash can often stand in for one another in mashes, gratins, soups and stews.

Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, spring rabe and romanesco, all brassicas, have similar flavors and behave similarly in many dishes, though certainly not all. Mashed cauliflower is delicious but I would not mash Brussel sprouts.

Leafy greens are eminently substitutable. Chards, beet greens, kale and collards, are all good raw (very thinly sliced) when young and tender. They behave quite similarly when cooked and can be mixed and substituted for each other at will. Turnip, radish, and mustard greens are all tender and often interchangeable, though radish tops are a bit fuzzy raw. Make sure to blanch those.

Get Good at a Handful of Dishes that Showcase most any Vegetable.

It’s not so hard to keep up when you have a handful of recipes that can accommodate most any vegetable and in a variety of combinations.

A simple frittata elevates most vegetables, from leafy greens to peppers, peas, herbs, potatoes and both summer and winter squash.

Pan-fried vegetable fritters/savory pancakes/patties transform mounds of vegetables of all kinds into savory nuggets. Broccoli with parmesan, leftover mashed potatoes, leeks and plenty of parsley, rutabaga and carrot latkes, Japanese-inspired cabbage pancakes with scallions, sesame oil and soy sauce. . .

Fried rice with loads of finely chopped vegetables; simple Thai-style coconut milk curries; and soups and stir-fries, of course, are all good vehicles for delicious CSA produce.

A quick, stove top version of mac ‘n cheese with whatever vegetables you have, chopped finely, never fails to be devoured.

Finally, recipes can often accommodate way more vegetables than they call for. Perhaps a recipe calls for 1 lb of pasta and 3 cups of vegetables. Invert that ratio and use ½ lb of pasta and 6 cups of vegetables or just add more vegetables and have plenty of leftovers. You’ll figure out how to make such changes and have recipes and tips work for your particular selection of produce.

Get comfortable making a few of these dishes and make them your own, with different spices, herbs, cheeses.

And then. . .

Cooking (with a CSA) can in fact simplify one’s life—a way through the general madness and a treat for the senses and body. Yes, this is work and it takes time and organization but the deliciousness of that regular infusion of produce is well worth it!

Cook With What You Have offers subscriptions for both CSA Farms and individuals to an online Seasonal Recipe Collection, organized by vegetable. It includes not only 600+ recipes but posts such as Lettuce Management and the Dressing Jar and recipe categories such as CSA Heavy Hitters and Meals that Make Great Leftovers and Pantry Stocking Guides. Katherine Deumling, owner of Cook With What You Have, wrote custom weekly recipe packets for CSA Farms in the Willamette Valley in Oregon for years before expanding her cook-with-what-you-have approach to cooking to this more accessible platform for farmers and eaters everywhere. The Seasonal Recipe Collection covers 80 vegetables, herbs and some fruits. Katherine’s enthusiasm for vegetables, any time of year, never wanes and the site is regularly updated and expanded with tips, recipes and lots of reasons to love produce!



 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 10/13/2017 7:07pm by Jill Rendleman.

I love sweet red Italian peppers, so there is not much I won't do with them.  First off, we had a great crop of peppers....and so CSA members reap the benefit first.......if it looks like a lot of peppers for the week, take 1/2 of your share, slice off the end cap and remove what seeds you can, then put into your freezer.  For the other half, think of some great ideas......easy first thought is pepper steak or pepper veggie stir fry.  These Italian peppers don't have the bite that bell peppers have, but they have a smooth deep sweet pepper taste.  So.....cut off the ends, slice in half, remove seeds, then slice longways into about 1/4 inch slices longways.  If you have some hot peppers, slice a few of those as well....or plan on adding red pepper flakes later.  Find some of those garlic cloves from a week or so ago, slice them....then heat up the olive oil and plan to flash fry the garlic and the peppers, very short like 3 or 4 min.  If you are a meat lover, you can do the meat sliced up thinly first, remove it, then add the peppers and garlic, and then toss them together.  Place over rice or over spinach or other greens.  Another fine thing to do with peppers is to slice longways in half.........making a "boat."   Then cook some rice or potatoes, stir in cheese or other veggies, or what ever is in your fridge.......and take this mixture and put into the pepper boat.  Put some mozzarella on top and maybe some parmesan, and bake at high heat until its crispy and bubbly on top......remove and eat!  These can also be cooler and frozen for a later meal.  Bottom line.......dont let these peppers go to waste......frozen they are a great addition to chili or any other winter soup.  

ok.....that was way too much info on peppers....but these emails are just to get your creative chef ideas flowing!   

cilantro........well there are nice tomatoes in your share to slice up and have with the cilantro.....but have you even considered cilantro pesto?  Easy.....place the cilantro bunch on a cut board, slice off the end three inches of stem, toss, dice up the rest of the cilantro quickly into smaller pieces.  Place diced cilantro into bowl, add olive oil to cover.  Dice up or add fresh minced garlic, then add shaved or shredded parmesan........lastly, add chopped pumpkin seeds, or if you are feeling financially sound, pine nuts.  mix all and toss into warm al dente pasta.....and yum.  oh so good.  the same recipe I use for basil pesto......just replace the cilantro with basil.....both are very tasty and very healthy.  

Greens and lettuces......you will get a lot this fall and winter.  They boost immune systems and keep digestive systems working well through holiday meals and stressful fall and winter events.......so more on this later, but a best practice is to take what greens or lettuce you are eating that day, and soak in room temp or a little cooler water for 5 to ten minutes......this plumps up and adds crispness to your green things.  Also an occasional aphid or slug will float up......we have already soaked and washed all......but if you want the most quality, after two days from your delivery......soak and place back in fridge.....pull out and dress right before eating.  

thanks to all CSA enthusiasts who are venturing into the winter solstice and beyond.  the full moon here and the rains have brought life back to new plantings......the moon was so bright last night, there was no need for a headlamp even in the woods!!!  

your farmer, jill

Working kitty aka hemlock kitty

guards plots for voles and eradicates mice in barns........a very important part of the operation.....seriously!!!!  





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 10/11/2017 9:02am by Jill Rendleman.

The first week went well with few hitches.  Thanks to all for picking up early and returning boxes from last drop off.  

Members will enjoy fresh spinach this week as well as year end tomatoes, peppers, potatoes and some herb that looks good after all the rain we had!  a downpour yesterday.....we were so dry it was good to see.  the apple trees are much happier. 

 We have some new members aboard so a few reminders....

Farm Pickup is 2pm and after, please drive slowly down the lane!  

Co-op Pickup is 4pm to 6pm - call or text if you won't be able to pickup, and we will put your share in the cooler.  

Town Square Market 4pm to 7pm.  call the market if you will be late.

Home Delivery- beginning at 2:30pm

Marion Friday 12:30 to 1pm.  

Here are some necessary items for great greens and salads.

 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 10/9/2017 5:02pm by Jill Rendleman.

We have several new members this week so we want to make sure we all are on the same supported agricultural page.   General info:  if you will be gone one week, please call or text 618-308-0217 to let me know if you want a double box next week, extras per your request in next 2-3 weeks, or if a friend is picking up for you.  

Co-op pickup 4pm to 6pm. if you cannot pickup, then you MUST text or call 618-308-0217 to have your share stored for pickup in Co-op cooler within the next 6 days.  You can pickup at your convenience.   If you do not call or text, your share may be at All Seasons Farm 7 miles south of Carbondale.  A beautiful drive, but not necessary if you call first.  

Farm Pickup:  AFTER 2 PM.  If you come earlier than 2pm, we may not have your order ready.  At 2pm, we have donated a space in our packing area to a group of beginning farmers,,,,,,to avoid them, come after 3pm or later.  

Town Square Market:  4pm to 7pm.  Call TSM DIRECTLY at 618-529-2312 if you cannot pickup by 7pm.  Otherwise, they will donate or discard your share that night.  

Home Delivery:  Starts this season at 2:30pm Carbondale and 12:30 Marion.......we should be completed by 4pm.  If you have specific instructions, please call 618-308-0217.  

We purposely have a small fall/winter member share season as there is more weather risk with this season......although there is also the most potential nutritional gain for this season.......which has been our experience.  Fall Winter shares are generally sold out prior to Oct 30th.  

End of Season Stew Bounty!!!

 





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 10/2/2017 9:33am by Jill Rendleman.

Several of you from past seasons have called to ask about the 2017-18 Fall/Winter Season.  You can sign up by clicking on                                               www.allseasons-farm.com/members/types   

or just give me a call at 618-308-0217.

I call this the healthiest of the seasons and its at a time our bodies need the strongest immune systems!

Look for greens and lettuces, fresh dug potatoes, sweet potatoes, butternut squash, beets, turnips, kales, micro greens, late summer tomatoes, lots of basil, parsley, dill, cilantro, Chinese cabbage, fennel, chard....o and the list goes on.  My favorite is the micro greens.  But a soup of late summer veggies is a great second!





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 9/30/2017 12:43pm by Jill Rendleman.

Nows the time to sign up for the Fall/Winter Season......probably the most nutritious season of the year. Returning members go to www.allseasons-farm/members/returning.  New members go to www.allseasons-farm.com and call if you have any sign up problems.    Late tomatoes are doing well, as well as butternut and other fall squash.....the cucs trying to beat the first fronts....... we also have kale and chard....... as are all the great herbs......basil, dill, cilantro, parsley.   Its been a long very dry hot late summer fall which herbs seems to love.!  Thanks to spring fed irrigation from the Cedar Lake aquifer, we have turnips, greens and lettuce in and happy.  The chickens are loving the cool nights and making lots of large eggs.  The nights come sooner and the days start later, but this time of year, the bugs are at their end season max, but we are using shade cloth and other techniques to keep them at bay.  

We plan to start NEXT WEEK OCT 5th.......in Cdale and Oct 6th in Marion.   PLEASE CALL IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS OR WANT TO SIGN UP OVER THE PHONE 618-308-0217.  your farmer, Jill

 





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 8/29/2017 11:26am by Jill Rendleman.

Last CSA share of the summer!   Thanks so much for all your support and kind words this year, it has been a bountiful and diverse year in veggies and it feels good to share the bounty especially with so many members who have been members through some really good times and some not so good times!  

Speaking of membership, the fall season is open for sign up if you are interested.  It will start early Oct and go into March.  Some of our members think this is the best season of the year due to the large amounts of really nutritious produce available in the winter. 

......CALL or TEXT me if you have something you want as additional in your box.  

Here's what we have a lot of......sweet red peppers, hot peppers of all types, potatoes,red and gold beets

I thought we would have some nice big amounts of pickling cucs, but they have come on as fast......if you want some of these, you could give me a CALL or TEXT next week.  





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 8/23/2017 7:44am by Jill Rendleman.

The eclipse was simply awe inspiring.  We gathered with neighbors and family near the farm pond and watched the miracle unfold.  What a mysterious and beautiful universe we are blessed to be a part of!  I was reminded about how I felt as a child when I first watched a seed I had planted in a cup, unfold its first green leaves.  

Pickup will be the regular schedule today.  Please bring any boxes you have not returned.  Next week will be our final member share distribution for the summer season.  We have a few things in abundance if members would like extras next week.....sweet red peppers, ugly but great tasting potatoes, pickling cucumbers.....which may not all b ready at same time but we can make arrangements for you to have them if you want to do some pickling later on.  Its been a long abundant CSA spring summer season, I would love to have any input from members as to how we can make this better...that is how we grow, from comments by members with suggestions for improvements or letting us know something that you really liked.  





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Whats in my CSA box? October 20th, 2017

Chard is the multicolored addition this week along with tatsoi, another fall green.  Chard is best cooked until the stems are tender for best flavor, while tatsoi, just cook until the color

New recipe: Tomato, Swiss Chard, and Ricotta CalzonesOctober 20th, 2017

Swiss chard is a good source of vitamin A and C and iron. For this calzone you can use either green chard or the slightly stronger flavored red. 2 T olive oil 2 C sliced red onions 2 large garlic

New recipe: Green SmoothiesOctober 20th, 2017

1/2 apple5 - 1" chunks frozen banana (always use and never more than 1 banana)1 fresh mango1/4 cup orange juice or 1/2 orange, squeezed1/4 cup water3 cups greens (spinach, kale, collards or chard)Blen

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