9535 US Highway 51 N, Cobden, IL 62920 Google Map 618-308-0217
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Posted 6/20/2018 7:03am by Jill Rendleman.

Members will enjoy new cucumbers, tomatoes, garlic scapes, and eggplant this week.  Let me know if you are due to for extras due to a vacation, we have a lot of cherry tomatoes and cucumbers!  The cucs are the small or "no seed" European style and delicious!   This is a great week for an eggplant parmesan or another fav dish.   Sometimes we have one or two eggplant haters.....if so, let me know what to substitute!  





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 6/14/2018 6:41am by Jill Rendleman.

Members will enjoy tomatoes!

yes and blueberries!  green onions and kale.   cant wait!  see you at pickup.  text for questions or other.   your farmer,  Jill





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 6/6/2018 3:13pm by Jill Rendleman.

Members can expect great things this week.  More farm potatoes, chard (except kale for the chard haters), and best of all, a large dose of fresh basil.  So what do you do with a lot of basil?  easy and delicious....make pesto.   Pesto is a meal in and of itself when tossed with noodles or atop bread.  It is so very easy to make.  Here's one from Alice Waters collection, if you dont know who she is, find out!  One of the more interesting women of our time.  

Pesto...makes about 3/4 cup

1/3 cup basil leaves

6 tb olive oil

2 tb parmesan cheese grated

3 tb pinenuts (or pumpkin seeds, or walnuts)

1 clove garlic

Put basil in the blender with olive oil, and garlic.  blend.  add cheese and salt.  blend.  

I make this in huge batches and put in jars with lids in fridge.  Stays good for a few months.  Add more or less basil or olive oil to your taste.....more oil means thinner pesto, less means more stout.  Pinenuts are super expensive so I usually use pumpkin seeds.   If you are going to store in fridge for a while, I would leave out the parmesan and add it in before you decide to eat it.  

Today we are seeing a few cherry tomatoes changing colors, but not enough for the whole csa pick, but hopefully next week we will see the first tomatoes.  The zucchini is flowering as are the cucumbers.  The peppers will be a while but they are looking nice.  Green beans are still young but hopefully the rain and sun is good for them.  It was a very short strawberry season, the rain and heat were not good for them.   Blueberries I can see them, doesn't look like a huge crop, but a little rain and we should see some nice berries.   This is the first year that I have had a space in time with no lettuces.  There was a weather related planting gap that is leaving 2-3 weeks lettuce naked .....as I do feel that way.  We do have more growing.....I know everyone is anxious for the summer veggies and we appreciate your patience with the most challenging of years!   

 

 

 





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 5/17/2018 2:05pm by Jill Rendleman.

Strawberries are in!  so sorry for the late notice, we had some heat and then rain issues and other things happening on the farm last two days.  Look for fresh kale, strawberries, dill, awesome mushrooms this week for shares of mushrooms!  Baby beets.....you MUST eat the greens.  They are delicious cooked at last minute along side the beets.   Beet haters you got an alternative in the box ...surprise!   





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 5/10/2018 6:48am by Jill Rendleman.

Chard is in, rainbow chard is beautiful braised on its on with olive oil, garlic, a little butter.  Or....look for chard and lentil soup recipes....its the way I love chard best.  Also look for more spinach, fresh mixed baby lettuce, and cilantro bunches for cilantro pesto!  Sorry, no tomatoes yet to flavor the cilantro.  Also, as a "treat" an introduction into a locally grown white rice that is non GMO.  These producers came to the winter market and have a great product.  You can try it today and let me know if you like it enough to want more.   

Remember to look for lots of chard and other recipes by veggie or fruit name at www.allseasons-farm.com, click on Recipes and look to the right to do a search. 

Rainbow Chard





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 5/2/2018 8:37am by Jill Rendleman.

Another member share pickup tomorrow.  Thanks for bringing your boxes.  They are quite expensive and we can use them several times.  Look for more tatsoi and lettuces in your boxes this week.  We also have some nice cilantro.  Perhaps some beets or potatoes.  Or maybe new chard! 

We finished planting tomatoes of all sorts.  They were tall and leggy and so hard to plant!   It was just too cold in the prior weeks to risk it!  Now right on to summer plantings of corn, zucchini, beans, and peppers.  Looks like the blueberries and strawberries made it through the freezing nights....but still keeping an eye on them.

Cant wait for summer.   your farmer, Jill





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 4/26/2018 7:00pm by Jill Rendleman.

This weeks mushrooms for the "16 week" mushroom share are Shitake!  yum.  great just by themselves braised in half olive oil and half butter, but fabulous a top any other meat or veggie dish.  We are so lucky to have Flyway Farm as a CSA partner.  

There are still about 5 mushroom shares still available.....for those who want to venture out. 





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 4/25/2018 5:57pm by Jill Rendleman.

Members will enjoy fresh mixes greens with edible flowers, spinach, romaine lettuce, and new dill.  What to do with greens?  we like them best braised, that is sautéed in a little hotter skillet for a shorter time, in olive oil and with a little minced garlic added about one minute before eating.  yes the flowers are edible.....in New York we could sell them by the ounce!  or prepare the greens as a salad with a lite dressing of olive oil, lemon juice, rice vinegar, and a dash of mustard.  These greens are densely nutritious and include tatsoi, mustard, endive, mizuna, and other asian greens.  Romaine that is not contaminated is at a premium now  so enjoy organic local non gmo never sprayed with anything romaine, pure and simple.  Our romaines are a smaller variety that are easily prepared for a salad with 5 to 6 inch leaf, versus 12-16 inch leaf.  Spinach is something you can incorporate into a green salad, or you could consider cooking in olive oil with a little salt and garlic.  Great with eggs or rice.  Dill----by now you know that I see herbs as a potential meal or primary meal enhancer.  I love dill mixed with sour cream and/or philly cream and topped on any meat or vegan dish, but especially good on fish.....ie salmon.   If you find in your CSA you have too much of an herb, leave it on a plate to dry in the kitchen and use it later or freeze it after it has dried.  Remember that herbs have kept major civilizations alive for centuries when no other food was available.  While we think of them as seasonings, we should really think of them as those things along with interesting taste, add nutrition, add probiotics, add new dimensions to the flora and fauna in your bodies immune system.   

Thats way too long but i will post in nonetheless.  Good eating, creativity, and good health to you.  your farmer, Jill

herbal brine





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 4/18/2018 8:10am by Jill Rendleman.

Members will be enjoying Tatsoi, a lovely asian green, our famous mixed lettuce mix, a nice big bunch of parsley, and either some greens or beets...no decision on that yet this am.  Tatsoi is great in a salad or simply braised with other greens, maybe a carrot for color, and tossed over rice.  Garlic is a key addition to braised greens....also, I like to add a little heat, ie a cayenne pepper or pepper flakes minimally.   Parsley is a meal on its own here at All Seasons.  We boil noodles, add mozzarella or some other decadent cheese, and then toss in the fresh parsley.....so good and very healthy.  

This week we have been preparing potato and tomato beds and planting a few green onions.  We think the frost bypassed the blueberries which were starting to bloom.....cross our fingers!  

See you in Carbondale and Marion at the regular times.....please CALL or TEXT for changes or substitutions.  618-308-0217.  your farmer, Jill





 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

Posted 4/11/2018 8:37am by Jill Rendleman.

this is a bit long....but it is really good info if you are in a CSA and want to start eating....and thus cooking differently.  happy reading!  your farmer, Jill

Katherine Deumling of Cook With What You Have

A CSA share offers a plethora of produce every week and with it varieties we may have never seen before, let alone cooked—a delight and a bit of a challenge, for sure.

Fresh, delicious vegetables chosen for me week after week is my idea of heaven. It hasn’t always been but I get more hooked every year. I’m hooked on the deliciousness, on not having to make any decisions about what vegetables to purchase, and on the creativity it inspires.

So, how does one get hooked?

Stock your Pantry, Two Ways:

Shop mostly to restock rather than for specific dishes. You’ll spend less time (and money) running to the store for last minute items and can instead spend your time cooking, eating, and creatively using what you already have.

This is a basic list but you certainly don’t need everything listed to cook many dishes. And, your pantry will reflect your particular taste. This is just a loose guide.

Purchased Goods for Pantry, Fridge and Freezer:

  • Lentils; French green, red, brown
  • Beans: black, pinto, white, chickpeas
  • Grains: brown and white rice, barley, farro, cornmeal/polenta, quinoa, pasta, couscous, bulgur
  • Seeds & nuts: sunflower, pumpkin, hazelnuts, walnuts, peanuts, almonds, etc.
  • Spices: cumin, coriander, mustard seeds, dried chilies, turmeric, caraway, paprika, cardamom
  • Herbs: thyme, oregano
  • Vinegars: cider, rice and red wine
  • Oils: olive, sunflower, coconut, sesame
  • Hot sauce, soy sauce, fish sauce
  • Dairy products
  • Eggs
  • Lemons and limes
  • Meat and fish in freezer: sausages, bacon, chicken, etc.

Semi-prepared Items:

When you have a little spare time you can add semi-prepared items to your fridge/ pantry that will make life much easier and tastier when you don’t have those extra few minutes to get a meal on the table.

  • Make a jar of vinaigrette and keep it in the fridge. Dress lettuces and greens as well as roasted vegetables or plain chickpeas/beans with the same vinaigrette, adding some chopped herbs and toasted seeds. Be creative!
  • Cook a good quantity of beans. Put beans out to soak before you go to work in the morning. Cook them that evening while you’re in the kitchen cooking something else for dinner anyway and have them ready for the next day or freeze half.
  • Cook twice as much rice, barley or farro as you need for any given meal and freeze half of it to make fried rice, rice and beans or a soup the following week on a particularly busy night when you need the head start.
  • Toast a cup of sunflower or pumpkin seeds and keep in a jar. Your salads will be better for them; your soups will have added crunch; your snacks will be cheaper and more nutritious!
  • Use a whole bunch of parsley or cilantro to make a quick, savory sauce with garlic, olive oil, lemon juice or vinegar. Stir in some thick yogurt for a creamy version. Having a flavorful component like this on hand means a plain bowl of rice or beans or a fried egg turns into a meal in no time.
  • Make chicken or any other meat, fish or vegetable stock and freeze.

Free Yourself from Strictly Following a Recipe
& Learn to Improvise and Substitute.

The more you cook—and you will be cooking (!)—the easier and more fun it is to substitute and adapt as you go. Families of vegetables such as brassicas and alliums have certain common characteristics that in many cases let you substitute one for another. However, there is no real shortcut to learning how to do this so experiment as much as you can—you’ll have plenty of opportunity. Here are a few general guidelines to get you started.

Root vegetables love to be roasted as do brassicas like kohlrabi, cauliflower, romanesco, Brussels sprouts and broccoli. Cut up, tossed with a little oil and salt and roasted in a single layer, they are delicious as is or can serve as the foundation for soups, mashes, salads, etc.

Onions, like their allium compatriots, shallots, scallions, leeks and garlic, are pungent raw and quite sweet cooked. If you don’t have an onion by all means use a leek, though leeks are sweeter and you might add a little acidity to balance it out and leeks are not so good raw. Scallions (green onions) and shallots can be substituted for onions and vice versa in many recipes, raw or cooked.

Sweet potatoes, potatoes, celery root, rutabagas and turnips and sometimes winter squash can often stand in for one another in mashes, gratins, soups and stews.

Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, spring rabe and romanesco, all brassicas, have similar flavors and behave similarly in many dishes, though certainly not all. Mashed cauliflower is delicious but I would not mash Brussel sprouts.

Leafy greens are eminently substitutable. Chards, beet greens, kale and collards, are all good raw (very thinly sliced) when young and tender. They behave quite similarly when cooked and can be mixed and substituted for each other at will. Turnip, radish, and mustard greens are all tender and often interchangeable, though radish tops are a bit fuzzy raw. Make sure to blanch those.

Get Good at a Handful of Dishes that Showcase most any Vegetable.

It’s not so hard to keep up when you have a handful of recipes that can accommodate most any vegetable and in a variety of combinations.

A simple frittata elevates most vegetables, from leafy greens to peppers, peas, herbs, potatoes and both summer and winter squash.

Pan-fried vegetable fritters/savory pancakes/patties transform mounds of vegetables of all kinds into savory nuggets. Broccoli with parmesan, leftover mashed potatoes, leeks and plenty of parsley, rutabaga and carrot latkes, Japanese-inspired cabbage pancakes with scallions, sesame oil and soy sauce. . .

Fried rice with loads of finely chopped vegetables; simple Thai-style coconut milk curries; and soups and stir-fries, of course, are all good vehicles for delicious CSA produce.

A quick, stove top version of mac ‘n cheese with whatever vegetables you have, chopped finely, never fails to be devoured.

Finally, recipes can often accommodate way more vegetables than they call for. Perhaps a recipe calls for 1 lb of pasta and 3 cups of vegetables. Invert that ratio and use ½ lb of pasta and 6 cups of vegetables or just add more vegetables and have plenty of leftovers. You’ll figure out how to make such changes and have recipes and tips work for your particular selection of produce.

Get comfortable making a few of these dishes and make them your own, with different spices, herbs, cheeses.

And then. . .

Cooking (with a CSA) can in fact simplify one’s life—a way through the general madness and a treat for the senses and body. Yes, this is work and it takes time and organization but the deliciousness of that regular infusion of produce is well worth it!

Cook With What You Have offers subscriptions for both CSA Farms and individuals to an online Seasonal Recipe Collection, organized by vegetable. It includes not only 600+ recipes but posts such as Lettuce Management and the Dressing Jar and recipe categories such as CSA Heavy Hitters and Meals that Make Great Leftovers and Pantry Stocking Guides. Katherine Deumling, owner of Cook With What You Have, wrote custom weekly recipe packets for CSA Farms in the Willamette Valley in Oregon for years before expanding her cook-with-what-you-have approach to cooking to this more accessible platform for farmers and eaters everywhere. The Seasonal Recipe Collection covers 80 vegetables, herbs and some fruits. Katherine’s enthusiasm for vegetables, any time of year, never wanes and the site is regularly updated and expanded with tips, recipes and lots of reasons to love produce!




 

Jill Rendleman

All Seasons Farm

9535 US Hwy 51 N

Cobden, Illinois  62920

www.allseasons-farm.com

facebook.com/AllSeasonsFarm

          

 

CSA Whats in my share? Pickup Reminder for Thursday June 21 and Friday June 22June 20th, 2018

Members will enjoy new cucumbers, tomatoes, garlic scapes, and eggplant this week.  Let me know if you are due to for extras due to a vacation, we have a lot of cherry tomatoes and cucumbers! &nb

CSA Pickup Reminder THURSDAY June 14 and FRIDAY June 15June 14th, 2018

Members will enjoy tomatoes! yes and blueberries!  green onions and kale.   cant wait!  see you at pickup.  text for questions or other.   your farmer,  Jill   Jil

CSA Pickup Reminder THURSDAY June 7 and FRIDAY June 8June 6th, 2018

Members can expect great things this week.  More farm potatoes, chard (except kale for the chard haters), and best of all, a large dose of fresh basil.  So what do you do with a lot of basil

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